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<< wacky weekly, 12/20 - 12/26 2004 Annual Training Totals >>
 hill workouts
Rickshaw
Runworks 2005 5M Racer
San Francisco, CA
Joined: 26 Nov 2004
Posts: 1157

hill workouts Posted: Fri Dec 24, 2004 11:52 am 

For the past couple of weeks, I've shifted most of my workouts to the hilliest possible areas, in order to get some trail running in. My typical 6 mile run now goes down up down up and includes about 700 feet of vertical ascent. Can there be such a thing as too much hill training, or can it only make me stronger? I'm curious how much hill training other people include in their workout schedules.

sfird
Runworks 2005 5M Racer
Long Island, NY
Joined: 10 Dec 2004
Posts: 80

Re: hill workouts Posted: Fri Dec 24, 2004 1:50 pm 

In my typical marathon training program I have 5 weeks with specific hill training. Once a week, I have a run where I warm up for 2 miles, run hill repeats (6-10 depending on where I am with my training) and then cool down with another 2 miles. In addition to this specific hill training, my long run includes a series of hills. After the five weeks I substitute speed workouts for the hill training for another five weeks. From what I've read, to lessen the chance of injury, you should only do one hard workout a week. My week consists of a long run, recover run, hill or speed workout, recovery run and medium long run. I also cross train one day a week and rest one day a week.

mfox

South Orange, New Jersey
Joined: 19 Dec 2004
Posts: 367

Re: hill workouts Posted: Fri Dec 24, 2004 9:08 pm 

I think if you don't push too hard on the hills (up or down) you can run them as much as you want as long as your body feels okay. But if your looking to use the hills as part of a hard workout (i.e. running up a 10% grade for 300-400 meters at 5K speed) then you should limit that type of workout to once a week. Not only do hills put extra stress on your muscles and joints but also stress other muscles that you normally don't use as much (if at all) when running on more flat terrain. So, you're more vulnerable to injuy when you push yourself hard on hills.

Gary Lambert

Pensacola
Joined: 24 Dec 2004
Posts: 3

Re: hill workouts Posted: Sun Dec 26, 2004 8:41 am 

I think the secret to hill running is to go easy and be patient, you goal is to build strength not speed.

Rickshaw
Runworks 2005 5M Racer
San Francisco, CA
Joined: 26 Nov 2004
Posts: 1157

Re: hill workouts Posted: Sun Dec 26, 2004 12:04 pm 

So if I run this hilly route 3-4 times a week at an easy pace, should I expect that the strength gains will help my racing significantly? Or will they only make me good at hilly races? Probably there is some transfer to level races, but like most things, you tend to get better at the specific thing you train to do.

Pithy Doug

Catskill Mountains of NY
Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 8

Re: hill workouts Posted: Sun Dec 26, 2004 3:13 pm 

Rickshaw wrote:
For the past couple of weeks, I've shifted most of my workouts to the hilliest possible areas, in order to get some trail running in. My typical 6 mile run now goes down up down up and includes about 700 feet of vertical ascent. Can there be such a thing as too much hill training, or can it only make me stronger? I'm curious how much hill training other people include in their workout schedules.


The obvious answer - much of anything is not good. Many of my trail races have 5,000 to 15,000 of elevation gain and loss so I spnd a fair amount of time on hills. I have a hill that is 5 miles up and 2,500 feet of gain - a very constant 500 feet per mile gain and I run one or laps and then power hike a lap or two. In trail races yo have best have your hiking muscles tuned along with your running muscles - yes, they are different.

In general people focus too much on speed top make them faster when hill training after a solid base will give you the biggest bang for the buck. The age old question - what kind of hills and how often. I typically try to match the length and steepness to the upcoming race. Train flat and race hills and you may as well bring a body bag.

So the question is, can you do too much - yes. When I'm training for a specific race I do the long pulls every other week. I may during the week do a shorter hill workout such as your 6 miles. What you thoroughly need to understand is your recovery rate. When in doubt opt for a longer recovery is the hill effort feels draining. In essense it's reletive but build slowly over time allowing for recovery.


BGibbsLMT

Southington, CT
Joined: 12 Dec 2004
Posts: 68

Re: hill workouts Posted: Tue Dec 28, 2004 8:42 pm 

Pithy Doug wrote:


The obvious answer - much of anything is not good. Many of my trail races have 5,000 to 15,000 of elevation gain and loss so I spnd a fair amount of time on hills. I have a hill that is 5 miles up and 2,500 feet of gain - a very constant 500 feet per mile gain and I run one or laps and then power hike a lap or two. In trail races yo have best have your hiking muscles tuned along with your running muscles - yes, they are different. .


Any idea how much elev. gain there is in the Escarpment trail run? And who left that plane there.


Pithy Doug

Catskill Mountains of NY
Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 8

Re: hill workouts Posted: Tue Dec 28, 2004 9:06 pm 

The web page http://www.escarpmenttrail.com/ says nearly 10,000 feet. Not bad for a 30k which does not fall into the often touted definition of an ultra which is greater than a marathon. Since I do a race the week before I organize the finish line which is simply timing and a body count. One needs to be able to stand the sight of blood

Have you run it?

As for the plane, how about Amelia Earhart. ;)


BGibbsLMT

Southington, CT
Joined: 12 Dec 2004
Posts: 68

Re: hill workouts Posted: Wed Dec 29, 2004 7:59 pm 

I did it this past year. Took a little over 5 hours. I'd love to go back but the three hour drive each way is a little daunting, especially the trip home. And thanks for the finish line organization, the photos were brutal.

Pithy Doug

Catskill Mountains of NY
Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 8

Re: hill workouts Posted: Thu Dec 30, 2004 3:05 am 

5 hours on this course is a respectable time. Out of the ten I did the best I could muster was 4:50. I understand it makes for long day especially if alone and you need to get there early for the bus to the start. In past years I would get up with the chickens to do Soapstone in your neck of tghe woods(or at least in the same state). I miss Jerry Stage, is he still directing this race for ther shinipsit folks?

How abount the Hinte-Anderson 50k in March in Mayland? See http://www.hatrun.com/ or if you're into a little longer race Bull Run Run(50 miles) in April. http://www.vhtrc.org/brr/ These are two class races but they do entail a night in a motel.


BGibbsLMT

Southington, CT
Joined: 12 Dec 2004
Posts: 68

Re: hill workouts Posted: Thu Dec 30, 2004 8:51 pm 

Pithy Doug wrote:
In past years I would get up with the chickens to do Soapstone in your neck of tghe woods(or at least in the same state). I miss Jerry Stage, is he still directing this race for ther shinipsit folks?

I did Soapston this year, Jerry Stage is still doing a fine job there.

How abount the Hinte-Anderson 50k in March in Mayland? See http://www.hatrun.com/ or if you're into a little longer race Bull Run Run(50 miles) in April. http://www.vhtrc.org/brr/ These are two class races but they do entail a night in a motel.


At this point my running skill or lack of it doesn't warrant spending money on a motel (except for the shad bloom 10K on Block Island but that's different)[/b]


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